Solitude and leadership and you

Being a leader does not always mean your job title is CEO or office manager or creative director. Leading from within is as affective if not more than leading from the top of the corporate structure. Based on William Deresiewicz’s essay/lecture (which I quoted portions of back in April, but for a refresher, read the article here: Solitude and Leadership), how would you apply some of the principles he suggests in “Solitude and Leadership”?

Maybe your work life is something like this. You have a full, eight-hour day work load of project management tasks (that you are trying to squeeze into ten hours), production items and internal and external clients to assist. Shortly after you sit down at your desk and take a sip of coffee, your email inbox audibly notifies you of an email from your supervisor. You do not respond to the email immediately because you are processing files from yesterday for today’s activities. These are files the supervisor needs by 10 a.m. That allows you one hour to complete the task. Within a few minutes you receive a Skype message from the supervisor asking if you saw the email. When you do not reply to the Skype message immediately, you receive a text message on my personal mobile device asking if you saw the Skype message about the email. Does this sound familiar? How do you handle such distraction and meet your supervisors requests and requirements?

This may be a mundane example, but it is more accessible to most readers than that of a Wall Street broker. So, how would you apply some of the principles Deresiewicz suggests in “Solitude and Leadership”?

Pageantry of vanity

It sort of overturns my apple cart when a script for an upcoming podcast — that I have worked on for months — seems to be summed up in under four minutes . . . on Youtube . . .

Are you part of the one percent?

Is the Myers–Briggs Type Indicator an accurate assessment of your personality type? Or just an extension of Jung’s four main archetypes?

Have you completed one of those online personality tests to determine your career path?

Here’s Memorado’s personality type: link.

What is your personality type? And how has this helped your career? Life?

Quote: Most people believe that technology is a staunch friend

“. . . most people believe that technology is a staunch friend. There are two reasons for this. First, technology is a friend. It makes life easier, cleaner, and longer. Can anyone ask more of a friend? Second, because of its lengthy, intimate, and inevitable relationship with culture, technology does not invite a close examination of its own consequences. It is the kind of friend that asks for trust and obedience, which most people are inclined to give because its gifts are truly bountiful. But, of course, there is a dark side to this friend. Its gifts are not without a heavy cost.”

–Neil Postman

Confessions : 10

01. It has been many winters since my last confession.

02. Yesterday, I jogged three miles west of the village.

03. In the rain. And wind.

04. A woman stopped her SUV along the road to ask if I needed a ride. I thanked her and declined.

05. I am reading a volume of poetry by Robert Lowell for the first time.

06. And also reading Lamentations.

07. Last week, the faithful MacBook Pro of seven years — named Hagar — nose-dived into hard drive oblivion.

08. Nearly seven days without a laptop and connection to the internet.

09. Hagar’s replacement arrived. Now connected to the matrix.

10. Somehow, I miss those days of non-digital, non-internet existence.

Previous confessions: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9]

Quote: “Technology is…”

“Whether or not it draws on new scientific research, technology is a branch of moral philosophy, not of science.”

–Paul Goodman

[Podcast] Translating Visions & Dreams Into Art & Music

SEPT2014_iTunes_ImageHow does an artist translate visions and dreams into pigment on canvas? These and other topics are discussed with artist Eva Scruggs. Next, poetry readings and acoustic singer/songwriter sets are common at bookstores and cafés. Join me and take a glimpse behind the scenes of one of those events that takes place at Malaprop’s Bookstore in Asheville, North Carolina. Finally, visit the Grey Eagle music hall and meet Deborah Crooks as she shares a conversation about liberation and home.

Special thanks to the Anne Malin for permission to use her song “darling” for the music between each segments. Anne Malin is a folk musician from Boston, Massachusetts. Her albums “Bog Songs,” “AM” and “Vessel” are available on iTunes and Spotify. New releases and a special edition of the album “Bog Songs” with art by Projekt Katharine is available at her Bandcamp page which is annemalin.bandcamp.com.

Listen on:
PodOmatic: coffeehousejunkie.podomatic.com
SoundCloud: soundcloud.com/coffeehousejunkie

3, 2, 1, it is almost here

Who is ready for another Coffeehouse Junkie audio podcast? This weekend, the next episode will be made available through select podcast services for you, the faithful Coffee Den patrons. Stay tuned for details tomorrow. Next week the podcast will be available to the general listenership.

So, what is on tap? First, how does an artist translate visions and dreams into pigment on canvas? These and other topics are discussed with artist Eva Scruggs. Next, poetry readings and acoustic singer/songwriter sets are common at bookstores and cafés. Join me and take a glimpse behind the scenes of one of those events that takes place at Malaprop’s Bookstore in Asheville, North Carolina. Finally, visit the Grey Eagle music hall and meet Deborah Crooks as she shares a conversation about liberation and home.

And, as always, the podcast features special music by a singer/songwriter I was introduced to thanks to some of the poets and writers in Racine, Wisconsin. I think you may enjoy the lo-fi, indie quality of this artist.


How long does it take to write a haiku?

How long does it take to write a haiku book cover

Purchase How long does it take to write a haiku? [Kindle Edition]!

One autumn evening, during supper, a father tells his children about the poet Basho. They are filled with curiosity and questions. One child asks, how long does it take to write a haiku? This collection features that story and others—plus a story that asks, is it possible to write a poem in your sleep?

When the Lights Go Out

When The Lights Go Out book cover

Purchase When the Lights Go Out [Kindle Edition]!

A light breeze from the south carries echoes of stories about creative space, laptop versus hand-writing and more.

A weather event prompted the author toward thoughts about our culture’s dependency on electricity and technology. These and other short stories complete this collection.

The Vanishing Art of Letter Writing

The Vanishing Art of Letter Writing book cover

Purchase The Vanishing Art of Letter Writing [Kindle Edition]!

When was the last time you wrote a letter? Not an email, but a handwritten letter with pen, paper, envelope and postage. Learn about a legacy of letters from a WWII soldier discovered by a son who never met his father. Years later he learns about his father through a collection of old war letters.