Another note

Upon acceptance of another story this week, I received this note from the editor:

 “Good lord this is good.”

The encouragement from these editors helps sweep a lot of self-doubt out of the way.

When the Lights Go Out

When The Lights Go Out book cover

Announcing the release of When the Lights Go Out: and other writings [Kindle Edition]!

This e-book collects four stories from a Coffeehouse Junkie audio podcast plus a bonus chapter. Inside When the Lights Go Out includes stories about creative space, laptop versus hand-writing and more. Here’s a list of the chapters:

  1. Creative space
  2. When the lights go out
  3. An audience of one
  4. Life is lived as a messy first draft

Plus a bonus chapter!

Listen to the audio:

And thank you for your support!

Download today: When the Lights Go Out: and other writings [Kindle Edition]

 

One of the three B’s?

ShostakovichThis morning, kidlinger walks up to my desk while I work, looks at the laptop screen critically and asks: “What’s that?”

Me: “I’m listening to Shostakovich.[1]

Kidlinger: “He’s not one of the three killer B’s.[2]

Me: “True. Would you prefer to listen to Bach, Beethoven, or Brahms?”

Kidlinger: “I don’t know.”

Me: “How about some Bach… violin sonata in G minor? Something to encourage you to practice your violin.”

Kidlinger: “Yeah, that sounds good.”

NOTES:
[1] Here’s a brief bio on Shostakovich: http://www.classical.net/music/comp.lst/shostakovich.php
[2] This is not a reference to the 1991 release of Anthrax’s B-sides collection Attack of the Killer B’s. But it is a reference to the three greatest classic music composers, commonly knowns as the Three B’s, Bach, Beethoven, or Brahms. Here’s a link to recent relesases of the Three B’s from NPR’s “Music We Love Now: New Albums Of Bach, Beethoven And Brahms”: http://www.npr.org/blogs/deceptivecadence/2013/03/18/174659127/music-we-love-now-the-3-bs-on-cd

Quote: “I use the Internet intensely….”

I didn’t foresee that my whole little life was going to revolve around this object, this computer. That’s worth exploring to me, not simply being critical of it. If you’re going to have a movie about people my age in L.A., they’re going to have to be online a lot of the time or it’s not realistic. But for anything to happen, they have to stop being online. All of those little moments throughout the day when you’re like “What am I doing? Who am I?” I just check my e-mail, or I go online. That sort of mini-lost feeling isn’t new, but I’m curious what happens when you don’t really have to see it through, ever. There is always a distraction.

Miranda July, on the characters in her new film, The Future (via thesalinasvalley)