William Matthews on Money

Finished Time and Money last night. A line that keeps rolling around my head is from his poem “Money”:

What’s wrong with money is what’s wrong with love:

it spurns those who need it most for someone
already rolling in it.

On the bus to work this morning I thought about that as I read today’s Times. And again as I waited for a transfer at the bus station. Most people were there to make money—going to work. A peculiar exchange I watched as I read the paper. A man walked up to a seated woman and handed her a folded note and motioned away from the station. She waited until he left her and then she unfolded the note, read it and then lit a cigarette. Over her shoulder, I read a name and a phone number. He held the bus he was waiting for until he realized she wouldn’t follow him. Then bus 20 arrived and she boarded.

Things don’t always follow the path I might have imagined. Like the poem I wrote during Monday night’s writers group. I thought about posting it but it turned out a bit darker than I planned. It was a simple exercise: write about an empty glass.

Even this post didn’t follow the path I intended…

7 thoughts on “William Matthews on Money

  1. Next time, I recommend working with a glass which is already empty, rather than drinking the contents yourself.

    Individuals pulled over to the side of the road for certain types of traffic stops also seem to have problems following the intended path . . .

    Poem:An Empty Glass

    Amorphous form without
    Purpose
    Beyond
    Holding my thoughts
    Since
    Contents
    Appear clearly gone.

  2. Sorry, I went overboard there on with my last comment, comparing you to an individual pulled over for a possible DWI.

    After all, that person probably knows that she is in serious trouble, trouble brought on–not by the wandering all over the road–but by imbibing mind-altering substances which allowed her to wander without wondering whether she should perhaps stop.

    You, on the other hand, are in full possession of you faculties and should know better.

    After all, you are setting an example for your brothers and sisters, and you . . .

    Whoops. Wrong rant. Must examine program subroutine for bugs.

  3. Woody, I don’t know. You might be right.

    I think, after reading what I posted, your first comment may have been accurate. Is there W.W.I. (writing while intoxicated) citation? I’ll have to check what they put in my coffee at McDonalds. I thought it was sugar and cream, but who knows?

    Almost considered not blogging again. Especially after reading the karagraphy.com post “Social Currency in the Karaoke Culture.” Maybe this is too much introspection. Not sure. Love your post “Who Moved My Chiz?”

  4. Read the Karagraphy post. Yes, too much introspection is not healthy.

    However, if you choose not to blog, you must do so for all the right reasons.

  5. When I blog, I try to bring a bit of craftsmenship to the postings in hopes that they will become something more than a diary or journal entry. Although this post isn’t a good example of this. “The Writing Life: Lessons” are a better example of this idea. I don’t know if I’ll stop blogging because the writing process is good practice for other projects I am working on. But reflection on one’s motivations to blog is good and important.

  6. Don’t stop blogging. Consider what you’re doing a type of The Artist’s Way exercise. It makes you think a bit, disciplines you a bit, hones your skills a bit.

    By the way, what do you think that whole note thing was about?

  7. Thicket Dweller,

    Thanks for your encouraging words. I’m not familiar with The Artist’s Way exercises, but I’d be interested in learning more.

    In regards to the “note thing” at the bus station… I really don’t know.

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